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8/15/2018

Veterinarian Jennifer McQuiston, an expert on Capnocytophaga with the CDC, says she has two dogs that lick her children, and most Capnocytophaga infections respond well to common antibiotics. People with alcoholism, the elderly, people with weak immune systems and people who do not have a spleen are at risk of sepsis from Capnocytophaga infections, and recognizing the symptoms is key to recovery, Dr. McQuiston and other experts say.

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USA Today
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CDC
8/15/2018

Medical screenings for gambling disorder will be required for people serving in the military under legislation signed by President Donald Trump this week. Keith Whyte of the National Council on Problem Gambling said active-duty troops have been found to have gambling issues at two to three times the rate of civilians.

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SBC Americas (UK)
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Donald Trump, National Council
8/15/2018

Elephants have 20 copies of the p53 gene, which encodes a protein that appears to activate LIF6, a previously dormant gene unique to elephants whose protein attacks mitochondria in cells with damaged DNA. The process causes apoptosis and may help explain elephants' resistance to cancer. The findings, published in Cell Reports, might give scientists a better understanding of how cancer develops and clues for treating cancer in people, study co-author Vincent Lynch says.

8/15/2018

Florida-based Adventist Health System will rebrand its 47 hospitals as AdventHealth to make them more identifiable. CEO Terry Shaw says his experiences trying to arrange post-discharge care for his wife after a truck crash made him realize Adventist needed to change its policies, leading to the adoption of a care navigator program.

8/15/2018

The study of a retrovirus that infects koalas revealed that the replicated viral DNA adopted new functions or became noncoding DNA, and the finding, published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, may help scientists understand the function of noncoding DNA in humans. "This means that the koala, a species not usually associated with biomedical breakthroughs, is providing key insights into a process that has shaped 8% of the human genome, and will likely show us what happened millions of years ago when retroviruses first invaded the human genome," said study co-author Alex Greenwood.

8/15/2018

Immune system T-cells triggered by bacteria caused retinal damage associated with glaucoma in mice, and blocking autoimmune activity might be a way to treat the eye disease, according to a study published in Nature Communications. "What we learn from the eye can be applied to the brain diseases, and may eventually help develop new methods of treatment and diagnosis," senior co-author Dong Feng Chen said.

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HealthDay News
8/15/2018

A report from cybersecurity firm McAfee showed that flaws in medical devices could allow hackers to change a patient's vital signs, including blood pressure, heartbeat and oxygen level, which "could lead to extended hospitalization, additional testing and side effects from medications prescribed to control heart rhythm and/or prevent clots," said Dr. Shaun Nordeck, who spoke with researchers for the report. Researchers were able to modify a patient's heartbeat data displayed on a central monitoring station by using an electrocardiogram simulator to intercept how the bedside monitor communicates with the central station.

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McAfee
8/15/2018

Team members need to know what's expected of them, with the leader communicating those asks clearly and often, write Karin Hurt and David Dye. Give people specific examples of expected behaviors, reinforcing them with reminders and acknowledgments every time they follow through correctly, they write.

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Let's Grow Leaders
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Karin Hurt, David Dye
8/15/2018

Some words and phrases may seem complimentary but send a mixed message, writes Judith Humphrey. "Sensitive" can play into gender stereotypes, for instance, and "sharp as a tack" can come off as a backhanded compliment to older people, writes Humphrey, who offers four other examples.

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Fast Company online
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Judith Humphrey
8/15/2018

A study in Clinical Endocrinology showed that individuals with nonfunctioning adrenal incidentaloma had a significantly higher frequency of metabolic syndrome and higher rates of prediabetes, dyslipidemia, hypertension, and increased waist circumference, compared with the control group.

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Endocrinology Advisor