Health IT News
Top stories summarized by our editors
1/19/2018

Hospitals that want to move to a cloud model can begin by creating that culture, because "most IT departments are not thinking cloud-first," said David Chou, CIO at Children's Mercy Hospital in Kansas City, Mo. Children's Mercy has more than 600 apps, most of which are in the cloud, and it moved its EHR to a hosted model.

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Healthcare IT News
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David Chou
1/19/2018

The Society for Vascular Ultrasound and other organizations are collaborating on a vascular ultrasound registry to help standardize vascular information related to treatment. The registry, which will supplement existing registries, will include actual patients' ultrasound images to facilitate future machine learning and analysis.

1/19/2018

Analyzing EHR data can show the prevalence of low-value medical testing and identify the causes of unnecessary tests, according to a study in the American Journal of Managed Care based on 13 measures identified by the Choosing Wisely campaign. Researchers said EHR data combined with manual chart review and administrative claims can help find low-value testing overuse and identify risk factors.

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EHR Intelligence
1/19/2018

Two studies in the American Journal of Managed Care suggest that health care providers use mobile health linked to smartphones to increase engagement of minority populations. Researchers said that while minorities have lower access to health care resources, those who use patient portals or personal health records are gaining access through a mobile phone instead of a tablet or personal computer.

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mHealth Intelligence
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mobile phone
1/19/2018

CMS Administrator Seema Verma said the agency will make health IT innovation and regulatory relief related to documentation a priority this year. As part of the Patients Over Paperwork initiative, Verma said the agency will seek to modernize Medicare and Medicaid through innovative health IT.

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EHR Intelligence
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Medicare, Medicaid
1/19/2018

MNsure, Minnesota's health insurance exchange, enrolled over 116,000 people in private plans this year, a record attained with a two-week shorter sign-up period. MNsure CEO Allison O'Toole credited the achievement to the flexibility Minnesota and other states have in operating exchanges.

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The Associated Press
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MNsure, MNsure
1/18/2018

Burnout among physicians may have been augmented by increased EHR use amid the shift to value-based care and their overwillingness to take on administrative burdens related to operating a practice, Dr. Donald Mack, family physician at the Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center, wrote in a commentary published in the Journal of the American Board of Family Medicine. Implementing direct primary care, which physicians said resulted in increased autonomy, control and time with patients, may be one solution for overcoming physician burnout, Mack wrote.

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EHR Intelligence
1/18/2018

New York eHealth Collaborative Executive Director Valerie Grey and Imprivata CIO Aaron Miri filled the final two slots in the ONC's 30-member Health IT Advisory Committee, which is scheduled to meet for the first time today. "The advisory committee will help shape the next phase of health information exchange in our country, while ensuring the interests of patients and the public remain at the center," said Grey.

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FierceHealthcare
1/17/2018

An emergency department nurse improperly accessed the health records of 1,309 patients at Palomar Health in Escondido, Calif., between Feb. 10, 2016, and May 7, 2017, a hospital spokesman said. The information accessed included patients' names, medical record numbers, medications and dates of birth, but financial and/or insurance information was accessed in only four cases.

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Palomar Health
1/17/2018

Dogs and people are prone to many of the same cancers, and clinical trials conducted in canine patients may ultimately benefit both, researchers say. Pet dogs are excellent cancer avatars not only because of their genetic similarity to people, but also because they live in the same environments we do, notes veterinarian and oncologist Douglas Thamm.

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American Veterinarian