Accounting
Top stories summarized by our editors
5/24/2018

A theory called the "fraud triangle" -- a framework that examines an employee's reasoning for committing fraud -- can help companies battle internal theft, Richard Summerfield writes. Other measures to prevent fraud include strong internal controls and anti-fraud employee training, Summerfield writes.

5/23/2018

People's attitude toward money, spending and saving is often shaped by lessons learned from their parents. It's critical to recognize these "money scripts" and to avoid repeating mistakes.

5/23/2018

Voice-controlled digital assistants are popular in the home. Can Alexa, Cortana, Google Assistant and others help you in the workplace?

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CPA Insider
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Alexa, Google
5/23/2018

About 40% of adults cannot pay a $400 emergency expense without borrowing money or selling something, according to a Federal Reserve report. However, that is an improvement from 2013, and the report says Americans' financial situation generally has improved during the past five years.

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CNNMoney, CNBC
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Federal Reserve
5/23/2018

Here's a step-by-step guide to calculating the new deduction for pass-through businesses and to determining who qualifies for the break.

5/23/2018

Both toxic employees and high performers might affect the work of people around them. Here are tips for retaining the most talented workers and for preventing toxic employees from entering your organization.

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Kellogg Insight
5/23/2018

Understanding the unique aspects of listeners is key for tailoring a presentation so it resonates. Think of your speech as a collection of modules that can be swapped out or reordered as necessary.

5/23/2018

Artificial intelligence can empower staff at accounting firms to do more interesting work, while leaving behind dull, repetitive tasks, experts say. Here are some best practices for running AI projects.

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AI
5/23/2018

Price is a senior lecturer at Harvard Business School and was CFO at Ahold USA.

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MarketWatch
5/23/2018

Michael Jackson's famous tilt in the video for "Smooth Criminal" was a product of great dancing and a little help, according to a paper in the Journal of Neurosurgery. Jackson had a shoe designed with a detachable heel slot to let him tilt 45 degrees forward without injury.

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CNN
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Michael Jackson