STEM Careers
Top stories summarized by our editors
11/22/2017

Students at an Illinois middle school recently took part in a Junior Achievement Career Fair in which they were encouraged to think about jobs and the future. The theme was "Start with the End in Mind," and students heard from presenters such as analytical chemist Kimberly Roewe, who urged them to pursue careers in science, technology, engineering and math fields.

11/22/2017

Five high-school girls, all members of a Minnesota 4-H club, helped raise the two turkeys that were sent to Washington, D.C., for the president's annual turkey pardon. The students cared for the turkeys, Drumstick and Wishbone, by checking on their food and water, cleaning their pens and helping them get used to people.

11/22/2017

Dark streaks seen on Martian slopes may not be evidence of water after all, according to findings published in Nature Geoscience. Instead, the streaks may be caused by granular material such as sand flowing down the sides of hills after they've reached a particular height, researchers say.

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Space
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Nature Geoscience
11/22/2017

Blue whales, who normally exhibit a right-side bias, change to a left-side bias when feeding on small crustaceans, according to findings published in Current Biology. Researchers attached cameras, hydrophones and sensors to blue whales and noticed that they typically roll to the left during feeding, likely to allow their dominant right eye to more effectively go after krill.

11/22/2017

Researchers in Penticton, British Columbia, have received a grant of approximately $71,360 from the Canadian Rheumatology Association. Funding will go toward developing treatments to help fibromyalgia patients manage their pain.

11/22/2017

The Delaware Center for Neuroscience Research, a collaboration between the University of Delaware and Delaware State University, has been awarded a $10.9 million grant from the NIH to examine brain function. Research topics will include brain changes due to traumatic stress, as well as neurodegeneration in people with Parkinson's and Alzheimer's diseases.

11/22/2017

A bovine birth simulator -- which is on display at a trade show in Canada, is the same size as a cow and has a working udder, uterus and full-size calf -- will be used to teach veterinary medicine students how to deal with birth complications. The cow "is a great way to get kids interested in asking questions and understanding where their food comes from," adds veterinarian Chris Clark, associate dean of the University of Saskatchewan's Western College of Veterinary Medicine.

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CBC News (Canada)
11/21/2017

Students at an Ohio high school soon will be able to design and build their own electric guitars through a new program. School officials say that students will learn all aspects of guitar production -- from design to assembly -- and will develop science, technology, engineering and math skills in the process.

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Ohio high school
11/21/2017

Concentrations of five microRNAs in saliva yielded 85% accuracy in identifying youths whose concussion symptoms persisted one month after injury, compared with about 65% accuracy using the Standardized Concussion Assessment Tool 3, researchers reported in the journal JAMA Pediatrics. The findings were based on data involving 52 children with concussions ages 7 to 21.

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CNN, National Public Radio
11/21/2017

A huge pencil-shaped asteroid, likely from another star system, zoomed past Earth in October, according to a description published in Nature. "It's extraordinarily elongated, which is extremely unusual -- we don't see anything like that in our solar system," said Karen Meech, leader of the study.

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solar system