Leadership
Top stories summarized by our editors
1/18/2018

Ford Motor will spend $7 billion originally earmarked for cars on developing SUVs, an indication of how automakers are losing interest in the less profitable sedan market. Today's SUVs and trucks also have better gas mileage and smaller, more lightweight designs than their predecessors, which potentially leaves the sedan without a place in the market.

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Ford
1/18/2018

Once we become deliberate about how we react to adversity rather than habitual, we can better manage our emotions and respond to others constructively, writes LaRae Quy. "Awareness and curiosity about our own emotions, as well as those of others, places us in a stronger position to not only recognize the negative ones but to anticipate how they could spin out of control," she writes.

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SmartBrief/Leadership
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LaRae Quy
1/18/2018

The lowest wage earners in the US are getting their first significant raise since the Great Recession thanks to near full employment, writes Annie Lowrey. Hiring is also extending to the long-term unemployed and other groups that traditionally are most likely to be out of work.

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The Atlantic online
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Annie Lowrey, labor market
1/18/2018

Giving feedback can be made easier if you explain why it's important and how it will help improve performance, writes Dan Rockwell. Many people don't want negative feedback, so remember to temper that with affirmation, he notes.

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Leadership Freak
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Dan Rockwell
1/18/2018

Employees will resent sweeping change that isn't accompanied by the necessary resources or communication about what the changes entail and how it relates to individuals, writes Paul LaRue. "Don't think the new systems will ferret out 'weak links' as you may lose good people who would otherwise be your champions with the right training and support," he writes.

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The Upwards Leader
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Paul LaRue
1/18/2018

Growth spurts can disrupt an organization's culture, making it crucial that leadership continue to be actively involved with staff on a daily basis, says Munjal Shah, CEO of Health IQ. He recommends holding office hours for mentoring and providing daily opportunities for people to share accomplishments.

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Fast Company online
1/18/2018

Divers recently discovered a 216-mile cavern when exploring a maze of channels beneath the Yucatan peninsula, and the find could offer insights into ancient Mayan civilization. "It allows us to appreciate much more clearly how the rituals, the pilgrimage sites and ultimately the great pre-Hispanic settlements that we know emerged," says Guillermo de Anda, the director of the Gran Acuifero Maya project.

1/18/2018

People who laugh together bond, so a workplace with leaders who exhibit a good sense of humor is more likely to collaborate around shared goals and resolve conflict, write Jamie Anderson and Gabor George Burt. Context is key, as self-deprecation by an executive might make that person appear more approachable but can also have downsides.

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Lead Change
1/18/2018

The National Labor Relations Board has overturned its policy that said some workplace rules, such as those dealing with confidentiality, civility and social media use, were unlawful if workers could perceive them as impeding the right to participate in protected concerted activity. The NLRB now will use a balancing test to determine whether a facially neutral policy is lawful.

1/18/2018

The Supreme Court could dramatically alter the future of public labor unions when it rules in the Janus v. AFSCME case, which the court takes up in a few weeks. At issue is whether government workers may be fired for not paying union dues.

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Supreme Court, Janus, AFSCME