Leadership
Top stories summarized by our editors
9/20/2018

Improving your awareness of who you are, how you behave and what you need helps with your career and has grounding in research, writes LaRae Quy. "Inaccurate self-assessment leads to sales targets that can't be met, deadlines that can't be carried out and performances that are promised but not delivered," she writes.

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SmartBrief/Leadership
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LaRae Quy
9/20/2018

Just as the ancient Greeks talked about ethos, logos and pathos, making persuasive arguments today requires credibility and logic, as well as an emotional appeal, says Carmine Gallo, Harvard instructor and author. "Everything about human nature -- from the stock market to where we invest to how we vote -- is based on our emotional narratives that we tell each other as groups and within individuals," he says.

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Knowledge@Wharton
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Carmine Gallo, Harvard
9/20/2018

Feedback is not objective, but when it comes from the right person at the right time in the right way, it can help people avoid making terrible decisions or developing an unrealistically negative or positive view of themselves, writes Art Petty. "The most significant source of heartache and the biggest missteps in your career may very well owe their existence to the absence of the right feedback," he writes.

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Art Petty
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Art Petty
9/20/2018

Below-average productivity growth, employers' demand for credentials and the decline of labor unions are likely reasons for weak wage growth even in an area of low unemployment, argues Annie Lowrey.

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The Atlantic online
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Annie Lowrey
9/19/2018

The NFL is the most popular television event around, even if it has become politically polarizing, is losing viewers and youth participants and could suffer reduced revenue when its broadcast rights come up for renewal, write Eben Novy-Williams and Ira Boudway. "As the world fragments, we actually become more valuable because we are one of the only things left that can aggregate tens of millions of people in one place at one time," says Brian Rolapp, the NFL's head of media.

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NFL, Ira Boudway, Brian Rolapp
9/19/2018

China has responded to US tariffs on $200 billion in Chinese products by imposing retaliatory tariffs on $60 billion in US goods. Both sets of tariffs take effect Monday.

9/19/2018

Companies that rely too much on singular executives rather than collective leadership struggle to retain leaders and respond to competitive changes, according to a report by EY, DDI and The Conference Board that surveyed more than 25,000 people. Consider using team-based bonuses, hire and promote people known to collaborate and be able to explain the organization's purpose, write Richard Wellins and Evan Sinar of DDI.

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CNBC
9/19/2018

Maximize your learning by avoiding shortcuts and trying new things, especially in areas that you typically avoid, writes Jesse Sostrin. "When you look for the easy way, you'll save some time -- but the lack of learning and growth will ultimately limit your progress," he writes.

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Jesse Sostrin
9/19/2018

Many customer-service problems stem from a lack of adequate training, poor staffing decisions and front-line staff not understanding why a policy exists, writes Dave Fish, founder of CuriosityCX. Companies should remove policies that block a smooth customer experience or are inconsistent from one service center to the next, he writes.

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CustomerThink
9/19/2018

Nimble leaders understand that listening and empathy guide what approach to take when managing people and solving problems, says Marc Randolph, a co-founder of Netflix. "What makes a poor leader is someone who applies the same methodology to every single circumstance," he says.

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Marc Randolph, Netflix